The View

Photo copyright Jamelle Kelly

Photo copyright Jamelle Kelly

San Francisco Peaks

The San Francisco Peaks are volcanic in origin with Humphreys Peak reaching a maximum height of 12,633 feet, the tallest in the state. With views of the San Francisco Peaks in the background and surrounded by Ponderosa pine trees, Frontiere at Rogers Lake is a remarkable venue for your special event. The area surrounding Frontiere is level terrain comprised of Ponderosa pine trees, native grasses and wildflowers.

Rogers Lake

Rogers Lake, its basin spanning over one mile across and at an elevation of 7,335 feet, is located in the Upper Verde watershed and is a regionally significant, high-elevation wetland important to numerous wildlife species, including elk, black bear, pronghorn, bald eagles, and migrating waterfowl. The area also boasts a rich cultural history and a wide variety of native plant community types, as well as sweeping panoramic views of the San Francisco Peaks, Woody Mountain, and Woody Ridge. The area has prehistoric sites and scatter areas dating back 5,000 years, in addition to old railroad beds and log structures from Flagstaff's sheep herding and logging era. Visitors can experience the area through a multi-use trail system and enjoy views of the San Francisco Peaks.

Dark Skies

With an average of over 300 clear days every year, Flagstaff offers astronomers and amateur star-gazers ample opportunity to view the night sky. Flagstaff received International Dark Sky City designation in 2001, recognizing the City’s “commitment to and success in implementing the ideals of dark sky preservation and/or restoration, and their promotion through quality outdoor lighting” (International Dark-Sky Association).

Two direct beneficiaries of local dark skies are Lowell Observatory, on the western edge of Flagstaff, and the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, less than two miles northeast of the Rogers Lake County Natural Area. These organizations support a unique economic sector in Flagstaff, produce world class research, and attract tens of thousands of visitors each year. Maintaining the undeveloped, rural landscape of this area and managing the Natural Area as open space with minimal day-use development ensures continued compatibility with the area’s dark skies resources.

 
 
Photo copyright Jamelle Kelly

Photo copyright Jamelle Kelly

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